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The QueueOct 4, 2018 12:00 pm CT

The Queue: The gang goes raiding

So the South Park kids are known to play Warcraft and other Blizzard games; but you know who I’d really like to get see get into WoW or Overwatch?

The gang from It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Frank would obviously be an orc warrior tank, Dee would be forced to play a balance druid in moonkin form, Charlie would be an assassination rogue riding around on his rat mount while slowly turn into The Nightman, Mack would play a priest (I went there), and Dennis would be a ret pally.

Tell me that doesn’t work. I dare you.


KALCHEUS ASKED:

Q4tQ: Tauren have the option to have a cut off horn. Is that supposed to be a war injury, or something ceremonial that they do?

I like this questions! I looked it up, and found some interesting things. First, dehorning is considered a safety measure for livestock in many cases because it prevents further injury from feeding, barn equipment, and around humans. Second, a lot of groups oppose the process of dehorning and debudding; but in the world we live in the risks appear to outweigh the benefits.

What’s curious is in that in our world the procedure for removing horns is recommended to be done with various types of anesthesia and pain medication — the process itself is painful. That’s where most of the controversy over this comes (let’s not debate this either in the Queue, I doubt many of us are farmers and I’m simply stating facts). Infact, from what I’ve read the procedure is done most of the time by trained veterinarians.

So we know that the process is painful, and the health of the animals must be monitored and accounted for. Doesn’t sound like something one would voluntarily do.

Enter the world of Azeroth. I could see some ceremonial reasons why this would be done; humans are known to do things to their body that are not healthy for various cultural reasons, so I could easily see this being part of a ritual the Tauren have. I’ve always been one of those that have thought of the Tauren as very Klingon-like (no doubt influenced by some of their voice actors), and this would fit with it. That said, it’s also entirely possible it’d get broken in battle. Either way, I wouldn’t see many Tauren wanting to go through with it given the pain it causes.

I also want to quote Boven Whitehoof’s answer, I liked it:

I’ve always assumed, and RP’d on Boven, that it’s done intentionally. Horns do grow back if broken. Honestly, though, it’d be kind of dangerous to cut one as short as they are on Tauren. Like cat n dog claws, horns have a core in ’em and damaging that can be a bad thing. Horn infections are serious business and can even lead to death.


ARCHMAGE RC COMMENTED:

Interesting achievement update for Noble Garden:

Shake Your Bunny-Maker Use Spring Flowers to place rabbit ears upon females players of at least 18th level.

Sounds like we’ll be able to toss them on male characters as well, for the achieve

You are correct. And good.


KALCHEUS ASKED:

Q4TQ: If Vrykul ever become a playable race, what classes do you expect them to get? And do you think the history of Truthguard is enough to justify Vrykul Paladins?

Let’s start with the history of the Truthguard, from the in-game text via Wowpedia:

The titanic watchers Tyr and Archaedas created this shield when their comrade, Loken, fell to corruption. They gave Truthguard to a vrykul champion who used it to expose Loken’s treachery. When Tyr and his allies later stole the Discs of Norgannon and fled, the champion stayed behind and held off many of Loken’s servants. A desperate Loken sent horrific monsters after Tyr, who fell in combat. In time the vrykul champion migrated to Stormheim in the Broken Isles, where the shield was eventually entombed in the Path of Kings.

To me this has always seemed like it’s just a one-off sort of thing. When a race in WoW gets a playable class there is usually a fair amount of lore and story behind it. I’m not seeing that here. However, that doesn’t mean it’s impossible something will be written in the future. Weirder stuff has happened.

Second part, if they were to become playable classes, what would I expect? Let me jump into it:

  • Priest — we already know the preists have a glyph that’ll turn them into one when dead. It makes perfect sense.
  • Warrior — they have a warrior heritage and are sent on warrior tasks, especially in Wrath, so I’d see this here as well.
  • Mage — they’re post-living beings who can draw upon the leylines and perform magic already (I may be wrong about their source of magical energy here, don’t quote me). So to me this is another obvious choice.
  • Warlock — same as above.
  • Monk — along the same lines as them being a warrior, except they’re fighting with their hands.
  • Hunter — because WoW.
  • Death Knight — because Arthas.

ARTHONOS ASKED:

Tech question: I built my PC in August. I’m assuming if nothing has exploded or acted even remotely strange at this point, I should be out of the “I bought a lemon” zone, right?

You’re 99.9999% out of the zone. The remaining 0.0001% chance is if something goes boom in the next year while it’s still under warenty. That can happen, and I’m not saying that to scare you or anything, it’s just a simple facet of life with complex electronic systems. One bad transistor out of a billion and you’re not able to turn on the machine. It’s pretty remarkable that this all works when you stop and think about it.

In general I’ve found the systems that don’t work that I’ve made I find out within the first week. Most of the time the challenges come at the following points:

  • When I boot up the computer for the first time or after shutting it down a couple times. If it’s not working on the first boot, I’ve almost always forgotten to push the memory in all the way — that’s just me though. Later boot issues usually have been a bad SSD.
  • When I run WoW on ultra for a few hours. Here the problems I’ve encountered the most are usually my fault with poor ventilation or having some wire get jammed into one of the fans that normally don’t run in normal operation. Occasionally I’ve seen video cards fail here too because of a factory defect. Life pro tip: don’t ever buy a used or refurbished graphics card or power supply.
  • After I leave the computer on for a couple days and wake it up after going to sleep. Sometimes the motherboard or drivers are messed up when waking up from hibernation/sleep mode, and that can really screw with things. I did return a motherboard once because of this (I was so angry), and one time Windows wasn’t playing well with the particular chipset and I had to turn it off entirely.

Note that I don’t encourage anyone to leave their computers on. I know folks have different feelings on this, but at the end of the day it’s bad for the environment.


TKC ASKED:

Q4tQ: my 7th Legion rep is 4915/21000. What is the fastest way to exalted?

No lie, it’s a pain. But remember that once you hit revered you’ve unlocked the necessary part for Part 1 of the BFA Pathfinder achievement and are on your way to flying around the zones (eventually).

Getting to exalted, here’s what I recommend for the 7th Legion and Honorbound (on the Horde side) rep:

  • Do Island expeditions and get the quest drops, they reward 1,500 rep (note I have not gotten one, but this is what I’m told by several people).
  • Do all the world quests each day on the opposite faction’s territory.
  • Be sure to always do the emissary quest when it pops up — to me it seems this one appears more frequently than others.
  • Use your war resources and keep running rep quests on the mission table. Yes, some people will argue about this, but I hate the grind and this makes it a bit (not a ton) easier. ALWAYS do the ones that reward 900 rep when you have that 100% bonus guarantee. Those are huge — no one can argue with that.
  • Complete as many of the war campaign turn ins that you can, and do all the quests when your faction control Alterac.
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